Top Pick

This week our Top Pick of jewellery artists is Edinburgh based Caroline Cloughley. Caroline has many fears, lepidophobia (butterflies), mottephobia (moths), achluophobia (the dark), demophobia (crowds) and more she’s probably yet to uncover. Through her work, she attempts to externalize these irrational fears.

Meteor Ring

Meteor Ring

In her beautiful lepidophobia collection, Caroline uses contrasting materials such as precious metal and lamintated wings, to exercise her fear of the seemingly harmless butterfly. She creates jewellery with a rich narrative, reflecting the dichotomy of the beauty and terror found in the objects of her fears.

Thaumatrope Necklace

Thaumatrope Necklace

 Caroline also finds inspiration in the night sky to exercise her fear of the dark, which continues to trouble her long since childhood.

Wing earrings

Using her fears as inspiration and contrasting materials Caroline beautifully captures a sense of fragility in her work. By encapsulating materials which represent these fears she is creating a wearable representation of them which can be worn by and mean something else to someone else.

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Top Pick

Jewellery by Scottish artist, Beth Legg explores a sense of place through the embedded object and memory. The remote environment she comes from in the far north coast of Scotland  has strongly influenced the work she produces. She has always been fascinated by the hinterlands and quiet edges of places – a bleak remoteness which can be both beautiful and melancholic.

Inverted

Beths work is beutifully delicate and manages to capture moments of nature which would otherwise be ephemeral or transient.

Fallen Trees

Beth likes to think of the body as a landscape – the jewellery pieces are transformed when worn and the wearer appropriates the narrative of the landscape and forms their own associations through the piece. Away from the wearer she likes work to take on the character of still lives through a contemplative and sensitive interpretation of the sense of place.She tends to work instinctively with materials rather than contriving designs beforehand. She enjoys the labour of traditional hand tool methods – forming a dialogue with materials through the exploration of their innate qualities and discovering their inherent possibilities. Beth finds this process of designing through making both intellectually and emotionally satisfying.

Surfaces

Beths work can be seen as a moving dialogue – each piece an exploration of composing elements encompassing themes of landscape and memory, ultimately reflecting the often bleak and fragile nature of the environment she comes from.

Cullaloe2Cullaloe

Beths jewellery is incredibly thoughtful and the way she designs through her use of materials is inspiring in a world where CAD is becoming increasingly popular.

Top Pick

This weeks top pick is extremely talented Australian Jeweller living in Munich, Helen Britton. Here is some jewellery she created especially for a solo exhibition of her work, in Nurnberg,Germany.

Helen BrittonHelen Britton

Helen BrittonHelen Britton

Here is an excert from Helen’s diary which is featured on her Klimt02 page. It gives great insight into the motivations for her jewellery and the materials she uses.

Munich, 2007. I am still roaming around finding things, hunting for and gathering materials, like I’ve been doing for years. No sea shores here though, a few river banks now and then and also heaps of junk. Europe: the residue of matter, contemporary and otherwise is exotic and plentiful, piled up in the flea markets, spilling onto the streets out of shops, being broken or discarded and crunched back into the earth for centuries. In the last years I have stopped collecting just anything to make my pieces and have now restricted myself in a non-puritanical way to reworking elements that were originally made for the production of jewellery. This seems appropriate for one so obsessed with the significance and history of decoration, these elements making a kind of double reflection, a new intensity of purpose.

HB1These brooches are from her beautiful industrial series.Helen BrittonImg0650

For the exhibition she has created a wall installation of her drawings. Here is an exert from her artists statement about the installation.

What have we got here in this work? All themes of popular culture. Violence,
love, riches, sentimentally, humour, wisdom, the exotic, the precious, the rare;
a friendly small companion, a lucky charm, an amulet. Hope. The small and the
large refrain. While the components themselves are in the form of the cheapest
trinket, the sentiment that they intend to convey reaches into the deepest abyss.
Primal concerns. These components have come bubbling out of the history of
humanity and have drifted around the planet collecting along the tidelines of
human activity.

Helen Britton

Helen Britton

Helen also writes about her work beautiful and the words create a feeling of magic and mystery that trancends into her jewellery. Dont you think…?

If you would like to read more from her Artists Statement just click this link and you will be taken to the PDF document. Dekorationswut